Sunday, October 30, 2011

Knitted-Look Flowered Headband Pattern (Free)

I was recently commissioned to make a flowered headband to imitate a knitted version. I couldn't find a suitable pattern, so I made one up. My first attempt didn't yield the shape that I wanted - I was going for the shape of the popular calorimetry - and I didn't want to frog it for fear of ruining the yarn. I made a second attempt that was more successful, and I actually took the time to write down what I did. I can't post the pattern for the flower as it's from a book (100 Flowers to Knit and Crochet), but you can use any flower pattern that you want. There is no button on the headband in the pictures because I'm waiting to find out what color the recipient wants. I hope my instructions are clear - I've never written a pattern for anyone else's use.
Finished dimensions: 22”x6” (with overlap for button closure). Size can be adjusted by increasing or reducing the number of rows in the middle.
Materials needed:
-H hook (5.00mm)
-approx. 210 yards (190m, 100g) worsted weight wool (I used Patons Classic Wool)
-yarn needle
-button(s)

Gauge is approximately 21 stitches x 14 rows (alternating fpdc and bpdc rows) to 4"x4"

Ch. 11
Row 1. dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in nxt 7 ch
Row 2. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in 3rd ch
Row 3. turn, ch 2, bpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 4. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, 2 fpdc in nxt st, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 5. turn, ch 2, bpdc across, dc in turning ch
Row 6. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 7. turn, ch 2, bpdc across, dc in turning ch (all odd rows will follow this pattern until you get to the buttonhole – will be noted as ‘bpdc row’)
Row 8. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 9. bpdc row
Row 10. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 11. bpdc row
Row 12. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 13. bpdc row Row 14. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 15. bpdc row
Row 16. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 17. bpdc row
Row 18. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 19. bpdc row
Row 20. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 21. bpdc row
Row 22. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 23. bpdc row
Row 24. fpdc across, dc in turning ch (no increase)
Row 25. bpdc across, dc in turning ch Repeat rows 24 and 25 for a total of 16 rows of no increases (rows 24-39).
Row 40. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 41. bpdc row
Row 42. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 43. bpdc row
Row 44. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 45. bpdc row
Row 46. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 47. bpdc row
Row 48. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 49. bpdc row
Row 50. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 51. bpdc row
Row 52. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 53. bpdc row
Row 54. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 55. bpdc row
Row 56. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 57. bpdc row
Row 58. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, fpdc2tog once, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 59. bpdc row
Row 60. turn, ch 2, fpdc in each st across, dc in turning ch
Row 61. turn, ch 1, sc in each st across, sc in turning ch
Row 62. turn, ch 1, sc in nxt 2 sts, ch 3 and skip nxt 3 sts, sc in nxt 2 sts, sc in turning ch
Row 63. turn, ch 1, sc in each st and each ch across, sc in turning ch
Finish off.
Block.
Join yarn along edge, sc a border around headband.
Add a button, or two if you want some adjustability to your headband.
Decorate with a crocheted/knitted flower or buttons.

My view on free patterns:  This is just a pattern. If you make anything using it, the finished item is yours to do with as you please. Keep it, sell it, give it away...none of my business. It took me one afternoon to make this pattern, and that work is my little gift to my readers and anyone else who stumbles across this blog. If I didn't want people to use the pattern, I wouldn't share it. =)

EDIT:  Just a note on this pattern... I crochet rather tightly, so your gauge is likely to be different from mine. If you get done with the increase rows, and your headband is wider than you like, frog an increase-row (or two), and work from there. Also, keep track of where your half-way point is...if that length is more than half of what your desired finished length is, don't work as many even rows as the pattern calls for. This pattern is so simple to alter to your preferences. Personally, I wanted a very wide headband in the style of a knitted calorimetry. I made the headband just a little longer than necessary to make it adjustable (two buttons) because I didn't have the head circumference of the recipient. Also, the yarn can make a difference in your gauge. I made three headbands in the same brand/weight of yarn, and each was slightly different in size! So, there is variation even within the same brand of commercial mill-spun yarn. My overall point is this: tweak the pattern as you go to get exactly what you want out of it.

14 comments:

  1. What gauge did you get on the one you made?

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  2. I didn't measure before I blocked, but 4"x4" is approximately 21 stitches x 14 rows of alternating fpdc and bpdc rows.

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  3. why does yours look so thick? i used the same wool and mine is really thin.

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    Replies
    1. I used (and I loved) this pattern last year to make quite a few headbands. I don't crochet very tightly (I am not very tightly wound myself, maybe that is why) so I went down a hook size after my first one because it was rather thin. I never do gauge swatches because I am always too excited to start the project. I know I would save myself a lot of headaches (not to mention saving my wrist from redoing things) if I just made little swatches, but anyhow, there's how I solved it--a G hook even though it sounds really small.

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    2. Thanks, Amber Terry! That is a great idea - I don't think a 'G' hook is too small for a worsted weight yarn at all. I am tightly wound, so that's the hook/yarn combo I use for amigurumi. ;)

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  4. @Meaghan- Thanks!

    @Nicole- Sorry it took me so long to respond. Did your gauge swatch match the dimensions that I gave? The fpdc/bpdc stitches should make for a very thick fabric. I have a very tight gauge, though. I'd need to see a picture to tell you just what's going on...could you post a link to a pic?

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  5. I've made 2 headbands with your pattern and both times the edges curl up so that when I lay it down, both edges curl up on themselves and meet almost in the center. What am I doing wrong?

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    Replies
    1. That's normal and you're not doing anything wrong. The headband needs to be blocked - either wash it, pin it down and let it dry, or, pin it down and steam it.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  6. Hi Inez. I was wondering if you have seen any free flower patterns that look similar to the one you have.. I love it!

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  7. To make pretty much the exact same flower posted above by Inez, I modified the below pattern:
    http://protsenka.com/2012/03/27/3d-crochet-flower/

    Here is my revised pattern...

    Create a magic/adjustable loop:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvjYPFBP85c
    **I used this to eliminate the hole in the pattern I linked**

    Row 1: 6sc through the adjustable loop then pull the loop shut.

    Row 2: 2sc in each of the 6 sts from row 1. you will end up with 12 st

    Row 3: 2sc in each of the 12 sts from row 2. you will end up with 24 st

    Row 4: ch 3, skip 2 sts, sl st into the next st, repeat until the 24th st (8 loops of 3 ch)

    Row 5: sc, hdc, 3dc, hdc, sc in every 3ch loop around (makes 8 petals)

    Row 6: ch5, insert the hook into the 2nd ch of the skipped chains created in Row 4, from the back (while your flower is still facing you the RS), sl st, ch 5 and repeat, end with a slip st. (8 loops of 5 ch, underneath your first flower)
    **refer to the pictures in the original pattern for help with this part**

    Row 7: sc, hdc, 5 dc, hdc, sc in every loop making 8 petals, sl st to end the row

    Row 8: ch6, now do what you did in Row 6 except insert the hook into the 2nd ch(only one remaining) of skipped chains from Row 4. sl st, ch 6 and repeat, end with a slip st. (8 loops of 6 ch, underneath your first two flowers)

    Row 9: sc, hdc, 6 dc, hdc, sc in every loop making 8 petals, sl st to end the row, BO

    Hope that helps. this is the first time i've ever written a pattern, sorry if its no good.

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    Replies
    1. Note: In Rows 4, 6 and 8 I would sl st into the whole ch, not just the back loop only as these chains get pulled on quite a bit while making the actual petal

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  8. I have been .searching for a pattern like this, Thank You for sharing. I used a 3.75 hook as I got to (Repeat rows 24 and 25 for a total of 16 rows of no increases (rows 24-39) the headband started getting way to long , I could wrap it around my head twice... so I cut out the whole mid section . it fit fine, I think also it's a little wide, I could be doing something wrong.. but with minor adjustments it came out pretty cute :)

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