Sunday, October 30, 2011

Knitted-Look Flowered Headband Pattern (Free)

I was recently commissioned to make a flowered headband to imitate a knitted version. I couldn't find a suitable pattern, so I made one up. My first attempt didn't yield the shape that I wanted - I was going for the shape of the popular calorimetry - and I didn't want to frog it for fear of ruining the yarn. I made a second attempt that was more successful, and I actually took the time to write down what I did. I can't post the pattern for the flower as it's from a book (100 Flowers to Knit and Crochet), but you can use any flower pattern that you want. There is no button on the headband in the pictures because I'm waiting to find out what color the recipient wants. I hope my instructions are clear - I've never written a pattern for anyone else's use.
Finished dimensions: 22”x6” (with overlap for button closure). Size can be adjusted by increasing or reducing the number of rows in the middle.
Materials needed:
-H hook (5.00mm)
-approx. 210 yards (190m, 100g) worsted weight wool (I used Patons Classic Wool)
-yarn needle
-button(s)

Gauge is approximately 21 stitches x 14 rows (alternating fpdc and bpdc rows) to 4"x4"

Ch. 11
Row 1. dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in nxt 7 ch
Row 2. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in 3rd ch
Row 3. turn, ch 2, bpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 4. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, 2 fpdc in nxt st, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 5. turn, ch 2, bpdc across, dc in turning ch
Row 6. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 7. turn, ch 2, bpdc across, dc in turning ch (all odd rows will follow this pattern until you get to the buttonhole – will be noted as ‘bpdc row’)
Row 8. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 9. bpdc row
Row 10. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 11. bpdc row
Row 12. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 13. bpdc row Row 14. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 15. bpdc row
Row 16. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 17. bpdc row
Row 18. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 19. bpdc row
Row 20. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 21. bpdc row
Row 22. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, 2 fpdc in each of nxt 2 sts, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 23. bpdc row
Row 24. fpdc across, dc in turning ch (no increase)
Row 25. bpdc across, dc in turning ch Repeat rows 24 and 25 for a total of 16 rows of no increases (rows 24-39).
Row 40. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 11 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 41. bpdc row
Row 42. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 10 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 43. bpdc row
Row 44. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 9 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 45. bpdc row
Row 46. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 8 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 47. bpdc row
Row 48. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 7 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 49. bpdc row
Row 50. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 6 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 51. bpdc row
Row 52. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 5 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 53. bpdc row
Row 54. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 4 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 55. bpdc row
Row 56. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, fpdc2tog twice, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 57. bpdc row
Row 58. turn, ch 2, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, fpdc2tog once, fpdc in nxt 3 sts, dc in turning ch
Row 59. bpdc row
Row 60. turn, ch 2, fpdc in each st across, dc in turning ch
Row 61. turn, ch 1, sc in each st across, sc in turning ch
Row 62. turn, ch 1, sc in nxt 2 sts, ch 3 and skip nxt 3 sts, sc in nxt 2 sts, sc in turning ch
Row 63. turn, ch 1, sc in each st and each ch across, sc in turning ch
Finish off.
Block.
Join yarn along edge, sc a border around headband.
Add a button, or two if you want some adjustability to your headband.
Decorate with a crocheted/knitted flower or buttons.

My view on free patterns:  This is just a pattern. If you make anything using it, the finished item is yours to do with as you please. Keep it, sell it, give it away...none of my business. It took me one afternoon to make this pattern, and that work is my little gift to my readers and anyone else who stumbles across this blog. If I didn't want people to use the pattern, I wouldn't share it. =)

EDIT:  Just a note on this pattern... I crochet rather tightly, so your gauge is likely to be different from mine. If you get done with the increase rows, and your headband is wider than you like, frog an increase-row (or two), and work from there. Also, keep track of where your half-way point is...if that length is more than half of what your desired finished length is, don't work as many even rows as the pattern calls for. This pattern is so simple to alter to your preferences. Personally, I wanted a very wide headband in the style of a knitted calorimetry. I made the headband just a little longer than necessary to make it adjustable (two buttons) because I didn't have the head circumference of the recipient. Also, the yarn can make a difference in your gauge. I made three headbands in the same brand/weight of yarn, and each was slightly different in size! So, there is variation even within the same brand of commercial mill-spun yarn. My overall point is this: tweak the pattern as you go to get exactly what you want out of it.

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Cheshire Cat-o-Lantern

My hubby and I carved pumpkins today. I know, a little last-minute, but, we still managed to do it before the holiday. I usually do the average jack-o-lantern face. This year, I chose a more ambitious design. I printed off a screen shot of the Cheshire cat from Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland to use as inspiration, and drew it onto my pumpkin. And, I spent the next couple of hours carving. Now, my pumpkin initially had a bit of lean to it, and, after carving away so much of the front...it tips over backward if it isn't propped up! I didn't think it would be a problem before I started carving - I thought it would be cool to see the Cheshire cat's grin bobbing with the wind. No such luck. My hubby's pumpkin turned out really cool, too - it's the grim reaper. Our front porch is definitely a creepy place tonight!

Monday, October 24, 2011

A Book to Doodle In

Sometimes, I feel the need to mix it up with my journals. I love the clean look of a textured leather cover, but, a pretty floral design is just as welcome. The journal I carry everywhere was the inspiration for this one. The designs on both were inspired by silk embroidery designs from a book I have on 18th century embroidery. Drawing on leather is both a joy and a challenge. There is no room for error and the design has to be properly centered and fill the whole space. I ink the design on the leather before I stitch in the pages to make it easy on myself, and I use a Faber-Castell permanent pen. The design will 'soften' with time and use, giving it more of a tattoo feel.
This journal is filled with mixed-media paper and stitched with waxed Irish linen thread. The signatures are covered with beautiful decorative papers. A leather belt with a brass buckle keeps it closed and the finished measurements are 5.5"x3.75"x1.625" (14cm x 9.5cm x 4cm). No longer available in my Etsy shop.

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Another Octopus

I started out making this cutie for my shop. Then, I realized that I liked it too much to let go of it. So, I decided to keep it for my munchkin...for when he or she joins the outside world.
Like the previous octopus, it was all freeform. I can't bring myself to take the time to write down anything as I go, so, still no pattern. The yarn is dyed with Wilton's food coloring...blue and brown. I made the eyes a little differently, so that they didn't look quite so angry. Jacques just looks like he's contemplating something nasty. I didn't want my kid to be scared of his/her toys.

Saturday, October 1, 2011

Extreme Crafting

Well, the rumor mill has been churning at full speed. When we told our immediate family that we were expecting, we also told them that we weren't telling everyone until after I was safely through my first trimester. But, the temptation to gossip was apparently too strong for some of them to resist. I found out this afternoon that people I barely know are fully aware of my delicate condition. So, now that the gossips have stolen my ability to make the joyous announcement on my own time, here I am, telling everyone else before I was really ready to. I'm really not happy that strangers got to hear my good news before most of my FAMILY knew. In fact, I'm pissed. Anyway, I'm busy crafting a little one and trying to refrain from throwing things. ETA is in April.
It's such a little cutie! It kind of waved to us during our first ultrasound.